• Instructors

    Screen Shot 2020 10 23 at 2 34 40 PM Screen Shot 2020 10 23 at 2 34 40 PM | placeholder
    Sam Elkins

  • Skill Level

    Level 2

    Good: Your friends think you are good at taking photos.

  • What You Get

    2 hours of learning

    + 12 segments

    + Exclusive tips from Sam

    + Sam's Editing Workflow

  • Learn to

    Create a consistent look and feel

    + Setup Lightroom panel

    + Cull images and catalog organization

    + Use tools and shortcuts in Lightroom

    + Color correct images to create a natural style

What You'll Learn

Sam will take you through his editing workflow from start to finish, showing you what he does to get his consistent look and feel every time, no matter what you're shooting with.

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Introduction

1/12

A quick intro to Sam and what this lesson is all about.

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Philosophy

2/12

Sam discusses his editing philosophy, and how he ended up where he is at today. This provides a bit of context to the lesson, and ...

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Getting the Best RAW Images Possible in Camera

3/12

During this section, Sam goes into depth about why it’s so important to be happy with the RAW images you take, before you start ed...

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Culling/Importing Images

4/12

Before you even start editing, it’s important to understand how to organize and cull your images properly. Sam utilizes Photo Mech...

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Backup/Final Organization

5/12

Backing up your images is the most important part of making sure your images are safe and in multiple places. Sam walks you throug...

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Lightroom Workflow

6/12

Focusing mainly on what he uses on a typical basis, Sam walks you through his Lightroom Workflow, and what he does to each image w...

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How to Properly Edit Skin Tones

7/12

Skin Tones can be very difficult, and are usually a defining characteristic of a great edit. Sam walks you through his approach to...

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Editing Session - Lifestyle Shoot

8/12

Sam edits a lifestyle shoot he shot in 2019, explaining colors, why he chose the selects, and how to tell a story with a series of...

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Editing Session - Commercial Shoot

9/12

Sam walks you through a Commercial Shoot, showing you how he picks selects, organizes a story and finds a color palette for a spec...

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Editing Session - Achieving A Cohesive Look with Any Camera

10/12

In this segment, Sam edits images from some of his followers to show you that you can get consistent results with any camera, it’s...

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Export Settings

11/12

Sam explains his export settings, and how he resizes images for web, and social use.

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Conclusion

12/12

Wow. What a ride. We summarize the techniques taught and how you can apply them to your editing sessions. Thanks for watching, now...

Sam Elkins

Explorer and creator, based in LA.
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Screen Shot 2020 10 23 at 2 34 40 PM Screen Shot 2020 10 23 at 2 34 40 PM | placeholder
4.8
10 reviews from 0 Students
Moment Inc

Killing it!

Loved this course. Simply fantastic.

Gabe Trujillo

Great course!

Very informative. I learned a lot!

Richard Randle

Sam's Editing Style

Found the editing tips very useful. Also, great to see someone maintain a true feel in a pic without the picture becoming obviously edited and unnatural. Over-saturation has been probably my worst crime. Time to get into a better habit. My only slight disappointment was the limited explanation in linking some of the editing tabs in LR Classic. For example when or when not to use tint (basic tab) versus the individual colour selection in HDR tab. Or how the tone settings under the basic tab linked in with those under the tone curve tab. Never quite sure why one had to change both eg Highlights, or why one more than the other, or what the differences were between white/ blacks in the basic tab to the lights, darks and shadows in the regional section of the tone curve? Apart from that, great. PS Does Sam have a social media group page where he could critique members' pics on a regular basis, both in terms of composition and post production? Would be happy to pay a monthly fee if reasonably priced?

Austin Robertson

Friends don't let friends edit without Sam

As a stubborn individual, sometimes it takes a friend to go: “hey...you might need some help editing” to finally get you to realize that maybe you need some serious help editing. In our community we call it getting slapped around. So a friend “slapped me around” and told me to go buy a lesson from Moment, specifically from Sam because he knows that I’ve been trying my luck with portraits...well...without any luck. My lights were blown out, shadows crushed, and my images were saturated soggier than a soup sandwich. Now I know what you’re thinking: how was I so bad at editing that I needed someone to physically tell me that I needed help? Truth is, there’s actually a lot of people that think you can throw a preset on a group of photos and everything will be cohesive and look great. I am not ashamed to be guilty of this. Who cares about skin tones when the preset is fire, right? Or the type of shoot, or the lighting of your subjects face, or the inconspicuous reds of shadows that give an image a warm, early morning feel? Who cares about the background of the image, what the subject is doing there, what kind of sentiment you’re trying to convey to your audience? Who cares about that tone curve when you can smash that matte option on the left side to make your image look like Garrett King took it? Why even bother buying this lesson when you can listen to the thousands and thousands of videos on YouTube? I’ll tell you why. There is a serious lack of authenticity in the photography world. Yeah, you can go on YouTube and watch some dude move some sliders around or pay somebody for a preset pack, but are you really consciously editing? The biggest thing I was looking for in this lesson was to come out with an understanding of WHY. Why do I move the tone curve like this? Why does split toning matter? Why should I make micro adjustments before macro adjustments? All of this is answered in this lesson. You’re not getting it on YouTube, I promise. And to everyone that thinks: “I’d buy this lesson but Sam doesn’t edit the way I want to edit.” I’d happily provide slaps for you. This lesson will provide you with the basics to go off and start or continue your stylistic journey with the consciousness and confidence you ought to have. Thank you for the lesson, Sam. Slap Spencer for me.

Szabolcs Ignacz

Awesome Lesson!

Sam is amazing in explaining and offering detailed information about all aspects of the editing process. I loved his "iPhone Photography: Learn to Shoot Like a Pro" so the "Editing" lesson is a great addition and a must-have to purchase.

Alan Imber

Good stuff

I enjoyed the simple yet interesting looks he explained. There was a lot of emphasis on getting good images in camera and I enjoyed that.

Melanie Brumble

Great beginner course!

First off I think the beginning of the course starts off great. Let's you know briefly what you'll be doing. The parts of the process. Make favorite part that stuck out was talking about creating presets on how to make sure to create them for every occasion. How important it is to prep before going and shooting. The whole course holds a lot of information in a good time frame, and learning pace. Compared to the usual way I edit Sam did a good job presenting how to use adobe lightroom desktop. My personal preference is Lightroom CC because of the design format. Ever since I did the course, I've been practicing the ways that can better refine my own presets and style. There was nothing confusing for me it was refreshing to learn a new approach to editing. Especially when he spoke about the importance of backing up photos. Especially went Sam went over the different camera profiles the way it will optimize the photo quality. What companies look for when working with other creators. Each section of the course wasn't too long or short just right.

Daniel Mojica

Learning in Corona times.

Since I can't travel and can't go outside to take new pictures, I have chosen to learn about editing, so I can keep busy and can keep improving in my craft. I have been a fan of Sam's visual style for a while now so when I saw that he had a class with Moment I got really excited and knew I had to to take it. And boy was I right, Sam's way to explain his process and workflow was super detailed. His teaching style was engaging and left me craving more of his classes. I am really looking forward to apply all his lessons to my workflow and see how far can I take it. Now, I am going to watch the class again, just for fun. Thanks Sam and Moment!

Stephen Mccaskill

Great Workflow and Advice for Photographers

This is my 3rd Moment lesson I have gone through, the first being Sam Elkins' iPhone Photography class and Andy To's Mobile Filmmaking course. Sam gives a full, but concise overview of his process and workflow with regards to editing photos. It's full in that you see many examples of various types of photography, from client shoots to portraits and even user-submitted photographs from various camera types and styles and how Sam goes through his editing process. It's a great walk through on how to work your way through the myriad options available in Lightroom specifically and most other photo editing programs in general to achieve the results you want. With regards to his use of Lightroom, I was initially a little apprehensive that the lessons would be so Lightroom-centric that I wouldn't get any value from his steps without using the same application. But in watching how he works, you can get a good overall feeling of how to move through the various options, most of which are in every application, and realizing that without Lightroom you don't have to feel hampered by not having every option he references. While he does spend a lot of time editing the photos, it's not dull or tedious. He steps through them in a very well paced method, going to over his reasoning behind the steps he is taking and why he is taking them in the order he uses. You get enough repeated exposure to the workflow to get the rhythm of it, without time wasted on extraneous information. After watching this and taking notes, something he suggests at the start, I am looking forward to going back through some of my old photos and re-adjusting them to see what new gems I can uncover with a better workflow to editing.

Stephen Mccaskill

Great Workflow and Advice for Photographers

This is my 3rd Moment lesson I have gone through, the first being Sam Elkins' iPhone Photography class and Andy To's Mobile Filmmaking course. Sam gives a full, but concise overview of his process and workflow with regards to editing photos. It's full in that you see many examples of various types of photography, from client shoots to portraits and even user-submitted photographs from various camera types and styles and how Sam goes through his editing process. It's a great walk through on how to work your way through the myriad options available in Lightroom specifically and most other photo editing programs in general to achieve the results you want. With regards to his use of Lightroom, I was initially a little apprehensive that the lessons would be so Lightroom-centric that I wouldn't get any value from his steps without using the same application. But in watching how he works, you can get a good overall feeling of how to move through the various options, most of which are in every application, and realizing that without Lightroom you don't have to feel hampered by not having every option he references. While he does spend a lot of time editing the photos, it's not dull or tedious. He steps through them in a very well paced method, going to over his reasoning behind the steps he is taking and why he is taking them in the order he uses. You get enough repeated exposure to the workflow to get the rhythm of it, without time wasted on extraneous information. After watching this and taking notes, something he suggests at the start, I am looking forward to going back through some of my old photos and re-adjusting them to see what new gems I can uncover with a better workflow to editing.